Andreea Vlad on the need for creating and sharing your art

Updated: Oct 27


Andreea Vlad is a Copenhagen-based Visual Artist and a Teaching Artist at ARTNSIPS. Andreea

has a broad international academic background in the fields of Fine Arts and Communication Design. She currently works in collaboration with ARTNSIPS where she leads ARTNSIPS' Figure Drawing events. In this interview, we explore her passion for drawing, her experience and knowledge as a visual artist, and her approach in leading ARTNSIPS' events.


Andreea Vlad in her art studio in Copenhagen, 2020. Photo by Marius Bogdan


How did your passion for visual arts become your career?

I have always liked to draw. It is a passion that I had since I was a kid, when I was spending hours and hours drawing since I enjoyed it. My parents saw that and they decided to guide me towards it. In different stages of my life, whenever I decided to go to high school and then, to university, I always came back to the question of “Why am I doing this besides the actual pleasure that it brings me? Is there a motivation behind it?”.

I am a curious person and I like to learn. I just follow this instinct to see what is out there and to try to become better at my craft and to develop a more studied way of expressing my ideas. That is why my curiosity began to be a mission in itself: to become better at this craft. I just wanted to study it because it was a calling.

My motivation is an intrinsic need to create and to put images into the world. And now, having these teaching sessions and guiding people through it, it is also a way to share this gift with others.

"My motivation is an intrinsic need to create and to put images into the world. And now, having these teaching sessions and guiding people through it, it is also a way to share this gift with others."

What advice would you give to an artist that is starting their career?

My advice would be to be patient and to be willing to put in the hours because whatever you decide to do in form of an art, medium, or technique, it will get better just by doing it. It is a skill that you learn and that you have to practice in order to be good at it: you have to do it and fail at it as often and as much as possible.

It is also good to know what others are doing and what others did before, even though you do not want to repeat it. It is good to be knowledgeable about art history and to understand that the purpose and the role of art has also been changing throughout history.

By learning that, you also try to answer the question “Why am I doing this? What is the purpose?”. If you go beyond the inner inside idea of “I just want to create because I want to create”, you know that your skill and your craft can bring a message to the world. You need to be in control of that message and to know what message is it for then people to know that “this art means something to me”.

What do you consider essential to be successful as an artist?

I do not necessarily see it as a demand to be successful. Success is very personal. For me to be successful as an artist, at least in this point in my life and in my career, it is to have the time and the luxury of time to be in my studio to create and to produce work. I am challenged by the time limitation of having to do so many other things in order for my life to function properly that I find it difficult to find the time to actually sit down and to give myself, let’s say, five hours at once, to go deep into my practice.

What happens afterwards with my work -if it sells or not, if it is liked by people, or if it reaches the message that I intend- that is out of my hands. It is something that I cannot really control and it is to the decision of the others. But what I can control is how much time I actually put into my work, how much I allow myself to experiment, and how much I conquer my fears and my limitations of what people would think if I would put this on the paper.


Andreea Vlad in her art studio in Copenhagen, 2020. Photo by Marius Bogdan


How did you start collaborating with ARTNSIPS?

I participated in one of their figure drawing events and one year after, I learned they were looking for artists. I decided to reach out and see if we were a match and if my ideas and my approach to teaching the classes would fit with their vision. And it did.

For a bit over a year, we have been doing a lot of events, between 10 and 15. It was my desire to share my knowledge of how to draw.

"My approach would be to focus as much as possible on the model and to observe reality. I try to push the participants to draw what they actually see and not to rely so much on their memory, their imagination, or a pre-imposed image."

Could you describe your approach when preparing for ARTNSIPS' teaching sessions?

I consider what is the crowd and how much time we have in order to see what we can achieve in this time together. I always have in mind that there are probably some participants with no prior experience while some others have been drawing before. I try to see how I can do it so it is interesting for everybody.

I prepare a series of exercises that will eventually lead to having a set of drawings. I give the participants some tips and tricks on how to approach start drawing a human figure. We start with warming up exercises for the hand in which we focus on using the line as a way of exploring different shapes and pressures. Then, I emphasize the looking aspect through exercises that really pushes them to look more at the model, and not at the paper almost at all.

My approach would be to focus as much as possible on the model and to observe reality. I try to push the participants to draw what they actually see and not to rely so much on their memory, their imagination, or a pre-imposed image. Since everybody will sit in a certain position in relation to the model and the angle of their point of view will be different, everybody will have a unique set of drawings at the end. That is also the beauty of it; because it is an expression that is unique as such.

After each event I think how to make it better: “How can I put it in the world with the right words for people to understand it?”. Because for me drawing comes naturally and it is like a second language… I learned how to draw the same time I learned to write and to read. I think about how to teach someone a language to get from not speaking it to write it in two hours. This is my search in this area.

Andreea Vlad in her art studio in Copenhagen, 2020. Photo by Marius Bogdan


What do you strive to teach to ARTNSIPS’ participants during your sessions?

They learn about figure drawing: how to start one, how to think about it, to look at the impression of the body and at the gesture of the movement that the model is creating. They also learn about proportions, the different angle lines that can be used in order to create a figure drawing, the point of balance in a posture… I emphasize on using lines and the construction bases beyond a figure. It is basically using the language of drawing and using lines to show how the human figure looks in certain poses. If they get this after two hours of drawing, my mission is accomplished.


"I am learning how to translate my skills and my knowledge into a language that is approachable by everybody and by any level of drawing."

What did you learn from leading these sessions with ARTNSIPS?

I regained admiration for teachers because it is quite the challenge to transfer the knowledge and the experience that you have as a practitioner and to put it forward as a lesson. I am learning how to translate my skills and my knowledge into a language that is approachable by everybody and by any level of drawing. As well as how to put it in simple words and in simple exercises so the participants get some tips and tricks, and then they can think forward by themselves.

It also gives me the chance to be in a social environment and to be with a group of people because as an artist you spend a lot of time alone, reflecting and meditating on your own research and practice in the solitude of your studio. So, it is a very nice social activity for me regardless of the role I play as a teacher. For this reason, I think that for me it is a good balance to do both.


What are your future goals and ambitions as an artist?

This year I am working on a project that is very personal and time-based. It is a self-reflective practice in which I use drawing to look at myself. I started the first day of the year, so I have been on this journey of self-reflection for some time now.

I am doing a drawing every day of myself, a self-portrait, using a mirror and ink on paper. It is an exercise in reflection. I have been doing this every day of this year, so my aim is to continue until the end of the year and to have at the end 366 drawings for each day. My ambition is to exhibit this large-scale project.


Andreea Vlad in her art studio in Copenhagen, 2020. Photo by Marius Bogdan


Remember to sign up for Andreea Vlad’s Upcoming Events at ARTNSIPS. The next Figure Drawing & Drinks event with Andreea will take place the 9th of December in Central Copenhagen.


To view Andreea's work visit: http://www.andreeavlad.com/work



By Clàudia Mateu Vidal, ARTNSIPS PR & Community Manager Intern

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